Acacia dawsonii

Distribution Map
Family: Fabaceae subfamily Mimosoideae
Distribution: Open forest and woodland on the slopes and tablelands of New South Wales as well as north-east Victoria and south-east Queensland.
Common Name: Poverty wattle.
Derivation of Name: Acacia; from Greek acis, a thorn.
dawsonii; After J. Dawson a 19th century botanical collector.
Conservation Status: Not considered to be at risk in the wild.

General Description:

Acacia dawsonii is an erect shrub 1.5-2 metres in height. Like most members of the genus, the mature plant does not have true leaves but has leaf-like flattened stems called phyllodes. In A.dawsonii the phyllodes are narrowly elliptic to linear in shape from 50-120 mm long by about 5 mm wide. They are slightly curved and greyish-green in colour. The golden yellow flower clusters are globular in shape and occur on short racemes from the leaf axils in spring.

Acacia dawsonii
Acacia dawsonii
Photo: Brian Walters

A.dawsonii is not widely cultivated but would be suited to smaller gardens because of its moderate size. It is attractive in flower and can be lightly pruned following flowering to produce a busy growth habit. It is a hardy plant suitable for a wide range of climates and soils, provided they are reasonably well drained, although it is probably at its best in less humid areas. It prefers full sun and is tolerant of at least moderate frost.

Propagation is relatively easy by normal seed raising methods following pretreatment by soaking in boiling water or by scarification. Propagation from cuttings has also been successful.


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